Walgreens Fast-Release Quick Gels Pain Reliever NY, IL, MO Class Action

Walgreens Boots Alliance, Inc. operates a large drugstore chain, including Walgreens and Duane Reade stores. It also makes generic versions of popular medicines. This complaint claims that the Walgreens generic Extra Strength Pain Reliever Fast-Release Quick Gels misleads consumers into thinking the product is comparable to Tylenol Extra Strength Rapid Release Gels, when it is not.

The New York Class for this action is all persons who, during the fullest period allowed by law, bought the Fast-Release Quick Gels in New York. There are also similar Illinois and Missouri Classes.

Johnson & Johnson began offering its Tylenol brand Extra Strength Rapid Release Gels in 2005. It promoted them by saying they were “specially designed” gelcaps “with holes to allow [for] the release of powerful medicine even faster than before.” In 2008, it began offering a Tylenol PM (nighttime) version of the medicine with the same promises.

Walgreens then devised its own versions of the two medicines, Extra Strength Pain Reliever Fast-Release Quick Gels and Extra Strength Pain Reliever PM Fast-Release Quick Gels.

The complaint contains images of the two boxes on its second page. Just visible on the first box is small type saying, “Compare to Extra Strength Tylenol Rapid Release Gels active ingredient.” The second box is a similar statement, offering comparison with the Tylenol PM product.

The complaint alleges that “the Walgreens brand acetaminophen Fast-Release Quick Gels … are marketed as comparable to Tylenol Extra Strength Rapid Release Gels even though, on information and belief, they do not contain the unique laser drilled holes of Tylenol Extra Strength Rapid Release Gels.”

The complaint elaborates: “Despite what Walgreens’ labeling and advertising would have consumers believe, the term[s] ‘fast-release’ or ‘rapid release’ do not actually mean that the drug works faster for consumers than non-fast or non-rapid release products.” Also, “Walgreens has long known or should have known that traditional, non-fast release acetaminophen products can be equally effective in the same, if not faster, time period than its Walgreens fast-release products.”

“In fact,” the complaint says, “a new study demonstrates that Walgreens’ Fast-Release Quick Gels dissolve slower [sic] than the Walgreens non-fast release products.” However, the complaint says, “Walgreens charges a premium” for the purportedly fast-release variety, trying to capitalize on the claims of the Tylenol product.

According to the complaint, Walgreens does this deliberately, selling the gelcaps “with false, misleading, unfair, deceptive labeling and marketing in an effort to dupe consumers into purchasing these gelcaps for prices that exceed their true value.”

The complaint cites state consumer protection laws among its counts.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Walgreens Fast-Release Quick Gels Pain Reliever NY, IL, MO Complaint

September 21, 2020

Walgreens Boots Alliance, Inc. operates a large drugstore chain, including Walgreens and Duane Reade stores. It also makes generic versions of popular medicines. This complaint claims that the Walgreens generic Extra Strength Pain Reliever Fast-Release Quick Gels misleads consumers into thinking the product is comparable to Tylenol Extra Strength Rapid Release Gels, when it is not.

Walgreens Fast-Release Quick Gels Pain Reliever NY, IL, MO Complaint

Case Event History

Walgreens Fast-Release Quick Gels Pain Reliever NY, IL, MO Complaint

September 21, 2020

Walgreens Boots Alliance, Inc. operates a large drugstore chain, including Walgreens and Duane Reade stores. It also makes generic versions of popular medicines. This complaint claims that the Walgreens generic Extra Strength Pain Reliever Fast-Release Quick Gels misleads consumers into thinking the product is comparable to Tylenol Extra Strength Rapid Release Gels, when it is not.

Walgreens Fast-Release Quick Gels Pain Reliever NY, IL, MO Complaint
Tags: Deceptive Advertising, Deceptive Labels, Item Does Not Do What It Is Advertised to Do