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Taser Pulse, X2, and X26P Models Inadvertent Firing Class Action

In this class action, the weapons popularly known as tasers are called Conducted Electrical Weapons (CEWs). The complaint alleges that the Pulse, X2, and X26P model CEWs had a defective safety mechanism, which could allow the weapons to discharge unintentionally. The complaint claims that Axon Enterprises, Inc., formerly known as Taser International, Inc., knew about the defect.

The Nationwide Class for this action is all persons and entities in the US who bought or owned a Pulse, X2, or X26P CEW made by Taser, not for resale, between April 9, 2015 and the present. There is also a Nevada Subclass, for persons and entities from the above class in the state of Nevada.

The number of affected weapons is not small. The complaint says that in the first nine months of 2016 alone, the company sold nearly 100,000 of these defective weapons. It sells the weapons to law enforcement and the military, and also to private citizens. The models are the ones at issue are the “citizen” ones. They are made to look like handguns.

Plaintiff Douglas Richey originally bought a C2 model taser for personal self-defense in 2016. However, that weapon was defective and malfunctioned, with the prongs ejecting only one to two feet. When he informed Taser of the problem, it shipped him a Pulse model to replace the malfunctioning C2.

In January 2017, Richey was carrying the Pulse in a neoprene case in his jacket pocket, with the safety on. As he was getting out of his car, the complaint says, “he heard a pop and smelled gunpowder.” He looked down to find the electric barbs sticking out of his jacket. The taser had gone off without his firing it. 

The complaint claims that the safety mechanism can be disengaged with very little pressure and puts the gun into firing mode with the safety only a fraction of the way to the full firing position. Also, the weapon can be fired with very little pressure to the trigger. 

When Richey informed Taser of the incident, he was told that “our engineers are currently aware of the safety switch activation [issue] and are working on a solution.” The company representative offered to send him barb replacement cartridges but did not offer to repair the weapon. 

The complaint alleges that Richey’s experience is not unique. Canada’s Defense Research and Development agency found the same problems in testing the Pulse. 

According to the complaint, the company refuses to repair or replace the defective items under warranty. The complaint claims breaches of warranties, fraudulent omission, and unjust enrichment, among other things.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Taser Pulse, X2, and X26P Models Inadvertent Firing Complaint

April 9, 2019

In this class action, the weapons popularly known as tasers are called Conducted Electrical Weapons (CEWs). The complaint alleges that the Pulse, X2, and X26P model CEWs had a defective safety mechanism, which could allow the weapons to discharge unintentionally. The complaint claims that Axon Enterprises, Inc., formerly known as Taser International, Inc., knew about the defect.

axon_tasers_inadvertent_discharge_compl.pdf

Case Event History

Taser Pulse, X2, and X26P Models Inadvertent Firing Complaint

April 9, 2019

In this class action, the weapons popularly known as tasers are called Conducted Electrical Weapons (CEWs). The complaint alleges that the Pulse, X2, and X26P model CEWs had a defective safety mechanism, which could allow the weapons to discharge unintentionally. The complaint claims that Axon Enterprises, Inc., formerly known as Taser International, Inc., knew about the defect.

axon_tasers_inadvertent_discharge_compl.pdf
Tags: Defective Product, Firearms