fbpx

Sig Sauer P320 Pistol Drop-Fire Defect Class Action

A gun that can fire a round when dropped has a serious defect. The complaint for this class action claims that Sig Sauer, Inc.’s SIG P320 semi-automatic pistol has this defect. This is alarming, given the gun’s popularity.

The class for this action is all persons in the US who bought a SIG P320 semi-automatic pistol, in either the full-size or compact version.

The complaint alleges that the P320 is a popular model, used by law enforcement officers, owned by many consumers, and chosen by the US Army to replace the M9 as the standard-issue sidearm for its service members. 

The US Army discovered the defect during field testing in April 2016. The Army then demanded a lighter, modified trigger for the P320s it ordered from Sig, and Sig gave it to them. Sig’s fix seems to have remedied the problem. However, the complaint claims the company still sold the defective models to other customers. 

The complaint quotes the company as marketing the pistol as “drop safe,” that it “won’t fire unless you want it to,” and that it is “originally manufactured free of defects in material, workmanship and mechanical function.” 

However, other users have found the same drop-fire problem with the pistol. 

In August 2017, Omaha Outdoors, an online gun store, published a report on its testing of four P320s. Three of them, when dropped at a certain angle, discharged more than half the time. The fourth did not, but it had a lighter, upgraded trigger.

The Houston Police Department also conducted testing. Its firearms instructor dropped a P320 thirty times in three different ways. It reportedly fired four times. 

Sig finally stopped selling the defective pistols in late 2017, but, according to the complaint, “Currently, there are believed to be approximately 500,000 defective P320 pistols in circulation in the civilian market.” 

CNN called forty firearms shops in twenty states and found that eleven were still selling the defective version of the P320. It also found that 162 of the 400 P320s sold on Armslist.com were the defective model.

The defect has led to injuries, the complaint says. For example, in January 2017, a member of the Stamford, Connecticut police force dropped his pistol and was shot in the leg. A member of the Loudon County, Virginia Sheriff’s Department was removing her pistol from the holster when it fired into her thigh, shattering the femur. A SWAT officer in Orlando, Florida was racing to a hostage situation when he dropped his gun and was shot in the leg. 

Despite all this, Sig still has not issued a mandatory recall. (It did offer a “voluntary upgrade,” but it was optional.) 

The complaint alleges breaches of warranties and fraudulent concealment, among other things.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Sig Sauer P320 Pistol Drop-Fire Defect Complaint

February 20, 2019

A gun that can fire a round when dropped has a serious defect. The complaint for this class action claims that Sig Sauer, Inc.’s SIG P320 semi-automatic pistol has this defect. This is alarming, given the gun’s popularity. The complaint alleges breaches of warranties and fraudulent concealment, among other things.

sig_sauer_inadvetent_discharge_compl.pdf

Case Event History

Sig Sauer P320 Pistol Drop-Fire Defect Complaint

February 20, 2019

A gun that can fire a round when dropped has a serious defect. The complaint for this class action claims that Sig Sauer, Inc.’s SIG P320 semi-automatic pistol has this defect. This is alarming, given the gun’s popularity. The complaint alleges breaches of warranties and fraudulent concealment, among other things.

sig_sauer_inadvetent_discharge_compl.pdf
Tags: Defective Product, Firearms