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Oral-B Charcoal Toothbrushing Products “Whitening” Ability Class Action

The complaint for this class action takes issue with three Procter & Gamble (P&G) Oral-B toothbrushing products that are made with charcoal. P&G promotes the products by claiming they will whiten teeth within as little as week, the complaint says, but it alleges that this advertising is false and that the toothbrushing products will not whiten teeth at all.

The class for this action is all persons in the US who bought P&G’s charcoal products during the relevant statute of limitations. California and New York Subclasses have also been defined.

The three products at issue in this case are the following:

  • Oral-B Charcoal Soft Whitening Therapy Toothbrush
  • Oral-B Clinical Charcoal Battery Powered Toothbrush
  • Oral-B Charcoal Electric Toothbrush Replacement Brush Heads Refill

The complaint alleges P&G falsely advertises the products as having “charcoal-infused bristles” that will “naturally whiten[] teeth” and that it will accomplish this in as little as one week.

Why does the complaint claim this advertising is “false, misleading, and reasonably likely to deceive the public”? The complaint claims that “the Charcoal products do not in fact provide whitening benefits, and certainly do not provide the whitening benefits within one week of use. In fact, charcoal in dental products such as toothbrushes has been shown to have no meaningful effect on teeth whitening.”

The kind of charcoal used in the toothbrush products, the complaint claims, is activated charcoal, which has been treated with oxygen at high temperatures to increase its adsorptive properties. The complaint claims, “For decades, it has been used in the emergency medical treatment of certain types of poisonings and drug overdoses, because, when administered correctly, it can absorb certain heavy metals, drugs, and other toxins.”

The complaint claims that its uses are “narrow” but points to a number of products that companies have been advertising as containing activated charcoal, “coupled with unsubstantiated claims about the ingredient’s effectiveness[,]” such as hangover prevention pills, face cream for a clearer skin, and even deodorant to absorb unwanted odors.

The complaint reproduces picture of the packaging of the three products, each displaying an image of charcoal specks and the claim that the product “Natually Whitens Teeth” or “Whitens Teeth in 1 Week.”

While the complaint alleges that no studies exist on the whitening ability of charcoal-infused toothbrushes, it claims that, in the peer-reviewed studies of charcoal-based toothpastes, “any efficacy claims related to teeth whitening are unsubstantiated.” The complaint thus asserts, “The consensus of respected dentists, researchers, and industry experts weighs against the use of charcoal-infused dental products, due to the lack of scientific substantiations on efficacy.”

In fact, the complaint claims that charcoal may even give teeth a grayish cast.

P&G, the complaint alleges, charges a premium price for the charcoal products, and this class action seeks a refund for the premium the plaintiffs paid for the products.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Oral-B Charcoal Toothbrushing Products “Whitening” Ability Complaint

March 15, 2022

The complaint for this class action takes issue with three Procter & Gamble (P&G) Oral-B toothbrushing products that are made with charcoal. P&G promotes the products by claiming they will whiten teeth within as little as week, the complaint says, but it alleges that this advertising is false and that the toothbrushing products will not whiten teeth at all.

Oral-B Charcoal Toothbrushing Products “Whitening” Ability Complaint

Case Event History

Oral-B Charcoal Toothbrushing Products “Whitening” Ability Complaint

March 15, 2022

The complaint for this class action takes issue with three Procter & Gamble (P&G) Oral-B toothbrushing products that are made with charcoal. P&G promotes the products by claiming they will whiten teeth within as little as week, the complaint says, but it alleges that this advertising is false and that the toothbrushing products will not whiten teeth at all.

Oral-B Charcoal Toothbrushing Products “Whitening” Ability Complaint
Tags: Claims Unsupported By Scientific Evidence, Deceptive Advertising, Deceptive Labels, Item Does Not Do What It Is Advertised to Do