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Old Spice Sprays Found to Contain Benzene Class Action

One of Procter & Gamble’s personal-care brands is Old Spice. The complaint for this class action alleges that certain Old Spice antiperspirant, deodorant, and body sprays are contaminated with significant levels of benzene, which it calls “a known human carcinogen.”

Two classes and four subclasses have been defined for this action:

  • The Economic Loss Class is all individuals who, from the start of the applicable statute of limitations period through the present, bought one of the contaminated Old Spice sprays in the US.
  • The Medical Monitoring Class is all individuals who, from the start of the applicable statute of limitations period through the present, bought and used one of the contaminated Old Spice sprays in the US and who have not been diagnosed with a benzene-caused cancer or other health condition.
  • Subclasses include Florida and California Subclasses for citizens of those states for each of the above classes.

The benzene turned up in tests performed by Valisure, a testing laboratory and online pharmacy. On November 3, 2021, Valisure put a Citizen Petition in to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asking it to recall certain products, including the Old Spice sprays at issue in this class action because of the presence of benzene.

Benzene has been proven to cause cancer in humans, the complaint alleges, including blood cancers and leukemia. Benzene can be absorbed through the skin or by inhalation.

Antiperspirants are considered to be over-the-counter drugs. They must be made according to the FDA’s current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) regulations. The complaint quotes the FDA’s website as saying that the cGMP regulations “contain minimum requirements for the methods, facilities, and controls used in manufacturing, processing, and packing of a drug product…”

Companies are not supposed to use benzene in drug products if it can be avoided. However, if a drug product represents “a significant therapeutic advance” over previous drugs, the FDA sets a guideline limit of 2 parts per million (ppm).

Valisure tested 108 batches of body sprays from 30 companies. It found benzene in 59 of the batches. Average concentrations of more than 2 ppm were found in 24 of the batches, including four batches of the Old Spice products. The complaint alleges, “Old Spice products had the two highest levels of benzene detected in any of the 108 batches analyzed by Valisure with two batches of the Old Spice Antiperspirant Pure Sport Spray showing concentrations of 17.7 ppm and 17.4 ppm respectively.

Benzene is not a substance listed in the ingredient panels for the products, which the complaint claims indicate it originates in P&G’s failing in its processes for making, processing, or packaging the sprays. The complaint also claims that P&G did not follow adequate testing procedures for its products or it would have discovered the high concentrations of benzene in its products.

The complaint asks for refunds for amounts that consumers paid for the products and for medical monitoring for their increased risks of cancer.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Old Spice Sprays Found to Contain Benzene Complaint

November 19, 2021

One of Procter & Gamble’s personal-care brands is Old Spice. The complaint for this class action alleges that certain Old Spice antiperspirant, deodorant, and body sprays are contaminated with significant levels of benzene, which it calls “a known human carcinogen.”

Old Spice Sprays Found to Contain Benzene Complaint

Case Event History

Old Spice Sprays Found to Contain Benzene Complaint

November 19, 2021

One of Procter & Gamble’s personal-care brands is Old Spice. The complaint for this class action alleges that certain Old Spice antiperspirant, deodorant, and body sprays are contaminated with significant levels of benzene, which it calls “a known human carcinogen.”

Old Spice Sprays Found to Contain Benzene Complaint
Tags: Contaminated with Harmful Substances, Contamination During Preparation or Use, Deceptive Advertising