Office Depot “Leather” Chair Is “Bonded Leather” California Class Action

Can a chair of “bonded leather” be sold as a leather chair? The complaint for this class action alleges that Office Depot, Inc. deceptively labeled one of its chairs as “leather” when it was made of bonded leather, an inferior material that the complaint alleges is not considered to be real leather.

The class for this action is consumers who bought chairs with wheels in California that look like they are covered on any outside surface with real leather, where Office Depot did not disclose at the point of sale, in the showroom display, or on its website pages language that revealed that the chairs were covered with “bonded leather” rather than real leather, and that also did not disclose the portions of the chairs that were not real leather and the percentages of covered areas that were not real leather.

On August 19, 2016, the plaintiff in this case, Gene Moran, bought a chair at Office Depot that he believed was full leather. It was discounted to $232.13, but the complaint alleges, “None of the items describing the chair for sale nor the invoice mentioned anything about “bonded leather,” and nothing mentioned any percentage of the chair that was not leather.”

Sometime in November 2019, the complaint says, Moran noticed that the chair was “peeling like dead skin from a sunburn.” He contacted Office Depot, saying he’d been sold a chair that was not really made of leather, but the complaint claims that the company merely answered that the chair was made of bonded leather.

What is bonded leather? The complaint describes it as “scraped, ultra-thin parts from cowhide that are bonded together and dyed to look like real leather.”

Moran says that “he took the chair to a leather repair expert, who advised that no one in the leather industry considers this ‘bonded leather’ to be actual leather, and that they are cheaply made Chinese chairs.”

When Moran went back to the Office Depot store to see how chairs are marked, the complaint claims that he found them now labeled as “bonded leather,” but he claims that the company “does not describe the percentage or locations on the chairs of the ‘bonded leather.’”

According to the complaint, “after several e[-]mail exchanges with Office Depot, [it] offered to replace the chair with the same bonded leather, which [Moran] rejected as inadequate because he understood he was purchasing a full leather chair, and would not compromise this material.”

The counts include violations of California laws, including the Legal Remedies Act and of the Business and Professions Code on Unfair, Illegal and Fraudulent Business Practices.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Office Depot “Leather” Chair Is “Bonded Leather” California Complaint

October 23, 2020

Can a chair of “bonded leather” be sold as a leather chair? The complaint for this class action alleges that Office Depot, Inc. deceptively labeled one of its chairs as “leather” when it was made of bonded leather, an inferior material that the complaint alleges is not considered to be real leather.

Office Depot “Leather” Chair Is “Bonded Leather” California Complaint

Case Event History

Office Depot “Leather” Chair Is “Bonded Leather” California Complaint

October 23, 2020

Can a chair of “bonded leather” be sold as a leather chair? The complaint for this class action alleges that Office Depot, Inc. deceptively labeled one of its chairs as “leather” when it was made of bonded leather, an inferior material that the complaint alleges is not considered to be real leather.

Office Depot “Leather” Chair Is “Bonded Leather” California Complaint
Tags: Deceptive Advertising, Furniture, Not Real Leather