Nutrabolt Scivation Xtend BCAA Muscle-Building Claims Class Action

Do branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) promote muscle recovery and growth? The complaint for this class action says no. It bring suit against Woodbolt Distribution, LLC, which does business as Nutrabolt for the claims of its Scivation Xtend BCAA products, alleging that the products do not build muscle but actually decrease muscle protein synthesis.

The class for this action is all persons in the US who bougbt Nutrabolt’s Xtend BCAA products:

  • Xtend Original BCAA a/k/a Xtend BCAAs
  • Xtend Elite BCAAs
  • Xtend Hydrasport BCAAs a/k/a Xtend Sport BCAAs
  • Xtend Ripped BCAAs
  • Xtend Energy BCAAs
  • Xtend Free BCAAs
  • Xtend Hydration + BCAAs ready-to-drink bottles

To build muscle, the body needs all nine essential amino acids (EAAs). These are called essential because they cannot be made by the body but must be taken in through food or drink.

The body must continuously synthesize muscle protein, to replace protein lost through muscle breakdown. The complaint refers to an article by Robert B. Wolfe, attached to the complaint as Exhibit A, to assert, “The ‘anabolic state,’ or muscle growth, occurs when the rate of muscle protein synthesis is greater than the rate of protein breakdown.”

The Xtend BCAA products claim to “Support Muscle Growth” and “Support Recovery.” However, the complaint alleges that BCAAs comprise only three of the nine essential amino acids.

Dr. Wolfe’s peer-reviewed study is entitled, “Branched-chain amino acids and muscle protein synthesis in humans: myth or reality?” The complaint quotes the paper as saying that “BCAA infusion not only fails to increase the rate of muscle protein synthesis in human subjects, but actually reduces the rate of muscle protein synthesis and the rate of muscle protein turnover.”

The complaint also quotes the paper as saying, “All EAAs must be available in abundance for increased anabolic signaling to translate to accelerated muscle protein synthesis.”

If not all EAAs are taken in, then the building blocks for muscle-building are taken from muscle breakdown. Thus “it is impossible for muscle protein synthesis to exceed the rate of muscle protein breakdown when the precursors are derived entirely from protein breakdown, and thus an anabolic state cannot occur in the absence of exogenous amino acid intake.”

The complaint also claims other authorities have come to similar conclusions.

For example, it quotes a study from the Gatorade Sports Science Institute as saying, “The claims for [BCAA] products are based on a wide range of mechanisms…. The physiological rationale for these claims, let alone robust evidence from well-controlled human studies, is often weak, if not completely lacking.”

It also quotes a study from Dr. Susan Kleiner as saying that “it may be appropriate to let clients know that BCAA supplementation may decrease their [muscle protein synthesis] and turnover, making them certainly not helpful, and possibly harmful, to their goals.”

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Nutrabolt Scivation Xtend BCAA Muscle-Building Claims Complaint

September 23, 2019

Do branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) promote muscle recovery and growth? The complaint for this class action says no. It bring suit against Woodbolt Distribution, LLC, which does business as Nutrabolt for the claims of its Scivation Xtend BCAA products, alleging that the products do not build muscle but actually decrease muscle protein synthesis.

Nutrabolt Scivation Xtend BCAA Muscle-Building Claims Complaint

Case Event History

Nutrabolt Scivation Xtend BCAA Muscle-Building Claims Complaint

September 23, 2019

Do branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) promote muscle recovery and growth? The complaint for this class action says no. It bring suit against Woodbolt Distribution, LLC, which does business as Nutrabolt for the claims of its Scivation Xtend BCAA products, alleging that the products do not build muscle but actually decrease muscle protein synthesis.

Nutrabolt Scivation Xtend BCAA Muscle-Building Claims Complaint
Tags: Deceptive Advertising, Deceptive Labels, Item Does Not Do What It Is Advertised to Do