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Natrol Biotin False Claims of Health Benefits Class Action

When taking supplements, we often think that more of a good substance is better, but that isn’t always true. This class action alleges that Natrol’s biotin products contain far more biotin than the human body can use and so don’t produce the claimed results.

Three classes have been proposed:

  • The nationwide class includes all consumers who purchased biotin products in the US during the class period.
  • The multi-state class includes all consumers who purchased biotin products in California, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, and Washington during the class period.
  • The California-only class includes all California consumers who purchased biotin products within the class period.

The class period will begin on a date determined by the applicable statute of limitations and will end on the date notice is disseminated.

Natrol makes and sells biotin supplements, including Biotin 5000 mcg Fast Dissolve, Biotin 10,000 mcg Maximum Strength, and Biotin 10,000 mcg Fast Dissolve. The front label of each product claims that it “Promotes Healthy Hair and Strong Nails” and also supports “energy” or “cellular energy production”. According to the complaint, these claims are not true.

Biotin is a B vitamin found in many foods, including liver, salmon, cereals, and several fruits and vegetables. The complaint says that biotin acts as a biochemical co-factor for five enzymes and aids in enzymatic reactions to help the body metabolize fats, carbohydrates, and amino acids.

While this function may be important, the complaint alleges that the amount of biotin the body needs each day is limited, and that when surplus amounts are taken, the body simply cannot use the additional biotin.

According to the complaint, the Institute of Medicine says that an adequate intake of biotin for adults is 30 micrograms (mcg) per day. Furthermore, the complaint says, healthy people take in 30-60 mcg per day as part of their normal, daily diets, and the average intake among North American adults is 35-70 mcg. Yet, the complaint says, the Natrol biotin supplements provide doses of 5,000-10,000 mcg, up to 300 times the adequate amount.

Cases of biotin deficiency are rare, the complaint says, and are mostly limited to those with rare conditions and those who ingest large amounts of raw egg whites. While studies have shown biotin supplements can help in these cases, the complaint argues that these studies have no connection to normal, healthy persons. Nor can Natrol claim that it meant to refer to these conditions, the complaint says, because FDA law does not allow the manufacturers of dietary supplements to claim that the supplements treat or cure diseases.

A 2000 report from the Institute of Medicine states, “No definitive studies demonstrate evidence of biotin deficiency in normal individuals in any group resulting from inadequate intakes.” Thus for most people, the complaint claims, the supplements are worthless because they are superfluous and cannot be used by the human body. 

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Natrol Biotin False Claims of Health Benefits Complaint

June 5, 2017

This class action alleges that Natrol’s biotin products contain far more biotin than the human body can use and so don’t produce the claimed results. According to the complaint, the body cannot use more than a limited amount of biotin, and healthy people generally get more than enough in their daily diets, so that any additional biotin is simply wasted.

biotin_health_benefits_complaint.pdf

Case Event History

Natrol Biotin False Claims of Health Benefits Complaint

June 5, 2017

This class action alleges that Natrol’s biotin products contain far more biotin than the human body can use and so don’t produce the claimed results. According to the complaint, the body cannot use more than a limited amount of biotin, and healthy people generally get more than enough in their daily diets, so that any additional biotin is simply wasted.

biotin_health_benefits_complaint.pdf
Tags: Deceptive Advertising, Deceptive Labels, False Health Claims