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Nationstar Mortgage Pulled Credit Report Without Permissible Purpose FCRA Class Action

Strangers can’t simply go pull up your credit report; they have to be authorized and/or be doing it for one of a limited number of permissible purposes—so says the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The complaint for this class action claims that Nationstar Mortgage pulled Plaintiff Jeffrey Helbling’s credit report without his knowledge or authorization, and without any permissible reason for doing so.

The class for this action is all persons whose consumer credit reports from any of the three major credit reporting agencies, including Transunion, Exquifax, and Experian, shows a consumer credit report inquiry by Nationstar Mortgage, between March 5, 2013 and March 5, 2018.

Congress passed the FCRA to preserve citizens’ rights to privacy by safeguarding the information stored by consumer reporting agencies. Credit reports can be written or oral, and they may contain information on a person’s credit scores and credit capacity, character, reputation, or way of life, all of which may be used to determine whether that person is granted credit or not. Consumers are entitled to keep personal information confidential.

Among the provisions of the law is that consumer credit reports can only be issued for a permissible purpose. These permissible purposes usually have to do with transactions initiated by a consumer—for example, when a consumer submits an application for a credit card to a company.

According to the complaint, Nationstar Mortgage (now known as Mr. Cooper) got in touch with plaintiff Jeffrey Helbling to see if he wanted to refinance his property. After discussing the options offered by Nationstar, the complaint says, Helbling decided that he was not ready to do so.

In or around August 2017, however, the complaint claims, Helbling received a communication from the company entitled “Credit Score Disclosure,” even though he had never submitted a credit application to the company or authorized it to pull his credit score.

The complaint alleges that Nationwide’s pulling of Helbling’s credit score is a violation of the FCRA, and it asks the court to award statutory damages, attorneys’ fees, and any other remedies the court finds to be just and proper.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Nationstar Mortgage Pulled Credit Report Without Permissible Purpose FCRA Complaint

March 5, 2018

Strangers can’t simply go pull up your credit report; they have to be authorized and/or be doing it for one of a limited number of permissible purposes—so says the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The complaint for this class action claims that Nationstar Mortgage pulled Plaintiff Jeffrey Helbling’s credit report without his knowledge or authorization, and without any permissible reason for doing so. Nationstar had solicited Helbling for a mortgage, but Helbling had decided he did not want to apply.

nationstar_fcra_complaint.pdf

Case Event History

Nationstar Mortgage Pulled Credit Report Without Permissible Purpose FCRA Complaint

March 5, 2018

Strangers can’t simply go pull up your credit report; they have to be authorized and/or be doing it for one of a limited number of permissible purposes—so says the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The complaint for this class action claims that Nationstar Mortgage pulled Plaintiff Jeffrey Helbling’s credit report without his knowledge or authorization, and without any permissible reason for doing so. Nationstar had solicited Helbling for a mortgage, but Helbling had decided he did not want to apply.

nationstar_fcra_complaint.pdf
Tags: Credit Reports, FCRA, No permissible purpose for request for report