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Mitsubishi Continuously Variable Transmission Defect Class Action

This class action brings suit against Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA) and Mitsubishi Motors Corp. (MMC) for certain of their vehicles that were built with continuously variable transmissions (CVTs). The complaint alleges that “the CVT is defective in that it causes the vehicle to shudder, surge, jerk, to delay acceleration or fail to accelerate, and, ultimately, [to suffer] catastrophic transmission failure.”

The complaint defines a class and five subclasses:

  • The Nationwide Class is all persons and entities in the US who bought or leased a class vehicle.
  • The subclasses include California, Michigan, and New York Subclasses, an Implied Warranty Subclass for those who bought or leased their vehicles in California, and a CLRA Subclass for those who are “consumers” within the meaning of the California Legal Remedies Act.

The class vehicles are the following when equipped with a CRT:

  • 2014-2017 Mitsubishi Lancer
  • 2014-present Mitsubishi Outlander
  • 2014-present Mitsubishi Outlander Sport
  • 2014-present Mitsubishi Mirage
  • 2018-present Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross

How is the CVT at fault? The complaint claims that “discovery will show that slippage of the CVT belt and resulting contamination of the CVT’s hydraulic pressure circuit and other internal components, miscalibration of the CVT control unit, and an inadequate CVT cooling system result in these failures.”

The complaint describes the defect as causing “sudden, unexpected shaking and violent jerking (commonly referred to as ‘juddering’ or ‘shuddering’) when drivers attempt to accelerate their vehicles; it causes the vehicle to lag or delay when the driver tries to accelerate, causing an unsafe, unpredictable acceleration; it exhibits a hard deceleration or ‘clunk’ when drivers either slow down or accelerate at low speeds; it causes complete transmission failure in the middle of roadways, and it [causes the CVT to suffer] catastrophic failure, necessitating replacement.”

The class vehicles come with powertrain warranties, for either 10 years or 100,000 miles or five years or 60,000 miles. But the complaint claims that reports to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) show that the failures have been happening within or just outside of those warranty periods.

According to the complaint, Mitsubishi has been aware of the defect since at least 2014, but it does not warn consumers. In fact, the complaint accuses Mitsubishi of actively concealing the defect. The complaint alleges that Mitsubishi “undertook affirmative measures to conceal CVT failures and other malfunctions through, among other things, Technical Service Bulletins [TSBs] issued to authorized repair facilities only.

The complaint alleges that the Mitsubishi companies “have instructed dealers to tell consumers their vehicles are ‘operating normally’ or ‘operating as intended’ when they are not, or to give excuses for sub-par performance.”

The complaint alleges that the defect puts drivers in danger, at increased risk of collision: “For example, turning left across traffic in a vehicle with delayed and unpredictable acceleration is plainly unsafe. In addition, these conditions can make it difficult to safely change lanes, merge into traffic, turn, accelerate from stop light/sign, and accelerate onto highways or freeways.”

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Automobile

Most Recent Case Event

Mitsubishi Continuously Variable Transmission Defect Complaint

December 3, 2021

This class action brings suit against Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA) and Mitsubishi Motors Corp. (MMC) for certain of their vehicles that were built with continuously variable transmissions (CVTs). The complaint alleges that “the CVT is defective in that it causes the vehicle to shudder, surge, jerk, to delay acceleration or fail to accelerate, and, ultimately, [to suffer] catastrophic transmission failure.”

Mitsubishi Continuously Variable Transmission Defect Complaint

Case Event History

Mitsubishi Continuously Variable Transmission Defect Complaint

December 3, 2021

This class action brings suit against Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA) and Mitsubishi Motors Corp. (MMC) for certain of their vehicles that were built with continuously variable transmissions (CVTs). The complaint alleges that “the CVT is defective in that it causes the vehicle to shudder, surge, jerk, to delay acceleration or fail to accelerate, and, ultimately, [to suffer] catastrophic transmission failure.”

Mitsubishi Continuously Variable Transmission Defect Complaint
Tags: Defective Automobile, Transmission