fbpx

Lullaby Paints, Ecos Paints No Emissions, No VOCs FTC Action

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has filed an administrative complaint against Imperial Paints, which does business as Lullaby Paints and Ecos Paints, alleging that some of the claims it makes for its paints in its advertising and promotion are not supported by scientific evidence. The complaint contains examples of these claims in IP’s advertising and website information.

In one brochure, IP touts its Lullaby Paints as being “non-toxic, no odor, no VOCs.” (VOCs, or volatile organic compounds, are carbon-containing compounds.) The pages of the brochure include a number of pictures of babies. Another paragraph says the paint is “Safe for use on baby’s walls, cribs, and toys. Safe for pregnant mothers.”

Another brochure has a photo of a pregnant woman.  Beneath the picture is a paragraph in quotation marks, as if the woman had said it, reading, “It’s wonderful to be able to use a safe, premium paint to surround my baby. It gives me peace of mind.”

A website page says, “The World’s Finest Baby Safe Paint!” Another calls it “the safest paint available. Newborn baby-safe. Pregnant mom-safe.” A third says it’s “Safe for baby. And the environment.”

According to the complaint, IP has made three claims in advertising and promoting its paint:

  • Lullaby and Ecos Paints are VOC-free.
  • Lullaby and Ecos Paints will not emit any chemical or substance, including VOCs, that harm consumers, including sensitive populations such as babies, pregnant women, and allergy and asthma sufferers.
  • Lullaby and Ecos Paints have been tested and proven safe.

The complaint says that IP cannot make these claims unless it has scientific proof or substantiation of these claims.

The FTC subsequently issued an order pertaining to IP’s representations about its paints in the future. The order defines terms such as “VOC” and “trace amount” and forbids IP to make unsubstantiated claims about things like VOCs and emissions. In order to make such claims, the FTC says, the company must have “competent and reliable scientific evidence that is sufficient in quality and quantity based on standards generally accepted in the relevant scientific fields” to substantiate the claims.

It also requires that, for compliance purposes, the company keep records of all products sold, of consumer complaints about the products, of advertising and marketing materials, of materials relied upon for any claims made, as well as materials that may contradict claims. 

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Lullaby Paints, Ecos Paints No Emissions, No VOCs FTC Complaint

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has filed an administrative complaint against Imperial Paints, which does business as Lullaby Paints and Ecos Paints, alleging that some of the claims it makes for its paints in its advertising and promotion are not supported by scientific evidence. The complaint contains examples of these claims from IP’s advertising and website information.

In one brochure, IP touts its Lullaby Paints as being “non-toxic, no odor, no VOCs.” (VOCs, or volatile organic compounds, are carbon-containing compounds.) The pages of the brochure include a number of pictures of babies. Another paragraph says the paint is “Safe for use on baby’s walls, cribs, and toys. Safe for pregnant mothers.” The complaint claims that IP has no tests or other scientific bases to substantiate these claims. 

1623080imperialpaintcomplaint.pdf

Case Event History

Lullaby Paints, Ecos Paints No Emissions, No VOCs FTC Complaint

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has filed an administrative complaint against Imperial Paints, which does business as Lullaby Paints and Ecos Paints, alleging that some of the claims it makes for its paints in its advertising and promotion are not supported by scientific evidence. The complaint contains examples of these claims from IP’s advertising and website information.

In one brochure, IP touts its Lullaby Paints as being “non-toxic, no odor, no VOCs.” (VOCs, or volatile organic compounds, are carbon-containing compounds.) The pages of the brochure include a number of pictures of babies. Another paragraph says the paint is “Safe for use on baby’s walls, cribs, and toys. Safe for pregnant mothers.” The complaint claims that IP has no tests or other scientific bases to substantiate these claims. 

1623080imperialpaintcomplaint.pdf

Lullaby Paints, Ecos Paints No Emissions, No VOCs FTC Consent Order

The FTC’s consent order defines terms such as “VOC” and “trace amount” and forbids IP to make unsubstantiated claims about things like VOCs and emissions. In order to make such claims, the FTC says, the company must have “competent and reliable scientific evidence that is sufficient in quality and quantity based on standards generally accepted in the relevant scientific fields” to substantiate the claims.

It also requires that, for compliance purposes, the company keep records of all products sold, of consumer complaints about the products, of advertising and marketing materials, of materials relied upon for any claims made, as well as materials that may contradict claims. 

1623080imperialpaintconsentorder.pdf
Tags: Claims Unsupported By Scientific Evidence, Paint, Safe Items Not Really Safe, Your Home