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L’Oreal Collagen Products Cannot Penetrate the Skin Class Action

Beauty products containing collagen have become popular as anti-aging products. L’Oreal makes two collagen products that it claims can “restore [the] skin’s cushion” and “smooth wrinkles.” But the complaint for this class action alleges that the products cannot do that because they are applied to the surface of the skin and collagen molecules are too large to penetrate it.

The class for this action is all persons who bought the products that falsely advertised that they purportedly contained collagen that could “restore [the] skin’s cushion” and “smooth wrinkles,” during the applicable statute of limitations.

The L’Oreal Collagen products including L’Oreal Collagen Moisture Filler Day/Night Cream and L’Oreal Fragrance-Free Collagen Moisture Filler Daily Moisturizer.

The complaint calls collagen “the main structural protein in human connective tissues, most notably human skin” and “one of the main building blocks for bones, skin, hair, muscles, tendons, and ligaments.” It can make up around 80% of human skin.

The human body makes collagen. However, the production of collagen begins to slow in a person’s twenties and thirties, and in response to things like smoking and sun exposure. Collagen loss eventually leads to saggy skin and wrinkles.

The idea behind collagen products is that they can replace some of the collagen that is no longer produced by the body. They are supposed to reduce wrinkles and give the skin more elasticity.

Sometimes collagen is sold as a supplement, in the form of collagen peptide powders, capsules, or liquids. But the complaint alleges that when collagen is sold in a form to be applied to the skin, it is “worthless,” because it cannot penetrate the epidermis, or the surface of the skin. The complaint claims, “This is because collagen molecules, with a high molecular weight of 300 kDa (kilodaltons), are too large to be absorbed into the skin when applied in a cream.”

One of the containers of the products at issue is labeled, “Restore skin’s collagen and smooth wrinkles.” The other is labeled, “Visibly smooth wrinkles. Restore skin’s cushion.”

The complaint thus calls the advertising for the product “false and deceptive.”

According to the complaint, L’Oreal “employs professional cosmetic chemists and microbiologists to create and test the chemical formulas for the Products. Therefore, [L’Oreal] knew or should have known that the Products are incapable of smoothing wrinkles and restoring the skin’s cushion as warranted.”

The counts include violations of New York’s General Business Law and California’s False Advertising Act and breach of express warranty, among other things.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

L’Oreal Collagen Products Cannot Penetrate the Skin Complaint

August 31, 2021

Beauty products containing collagen have become popular as anti-aging products. L’Oreal makes two collagen products that it claims can “restore [the] skin’s cushion” and “smooth wrinkles.” But the complaint for this class action alleges that the products cannot do that because they are applied to the surface of the skin and collagen molecules are too large to penetrate it.

L’Oreal Collagen Products Cannot Penetrate the Skin Complaint

Case Event History

L’Oreal Collagen Products Cannot Penetrate the Skin Complaint

August 31, 2021

Beauty products containing collagen have become popular as anti-aging products. L’Oreal makes two collagen products that it claims can “restore [the] skin’s cushion” and “smooth wrinkles.” But the complaint for this class action alleges that the products cannot do that because they are applied to the surface of the skin and collagen molecules are too large to penetrate it.

L’Oreal Collagen Products Cannot Penetrate the Skin Complaint
Tags: Deceptive Advertising, Deceptive Labels, Item Does Not Do What It Is Advertised to Do