Jump, Lime, Other City Scooters No Signals California Class Action

City transportation is no longer limited to buses and subways. Rental scooters are now on offer from a number of companies, including Jump, a division of Uber Technologies, Inc.; Lime, which is officially Neutron Holdings, Inc.; Segway, Inc., and Xioami USA, LLC. This class action brings suit against these companies, alleging that there is no safe way to follow city laws that require signaling while riding these vehicles.

The class for this action is all individuals in California who will rent one of the defendants’ scooters.

According to the complaint, Jump advertises its scooter as “fun, affordable, and easy to use” and does not require that customers have any instruction before they begin riding their scooters. All a person needs is a smartphone with the app to locate a scooter and activate it.

However, the complaint alleges, “To ride a scooter safely, due to the design and geometry of the vehicle, a rider must always use both hands. Attempting to ride a scooter with one hand causes it to become very unstable—a danger that increases with speed. Scooter manufacturers display warnings about the danger of one-handed operation of a scooter prominently in the owner’s manual.”

But there’s a conflict inherent in two-handed operation and city laws, the complaint says, in that “virtually every state … requires bicycle or scooter operators to employ hand signals when making turns if their bicycle or scooter is not equipped with an alternate means of signaling a turn.” They must also use a hand signal when they are slowing down or stopping.

The plaintiff in this case, Erin Norman, was riding a Jump scooter in San Francisco on October 29, 2019. At an intersection, she removed her hand from the handlebar to signal that she was about to make a turn. However, when she removed her hand, the scooter became unstable. Norman lost control, the scooter made a quick turn, and she fell to the ground. The fall dislocated her hip and caused multiple fractures.

The injuries, it says, “required a complex surgery lasting hours. These injuries have required many months of medical care and intense physical therapy which is ongoing even nine months after the accident. Substantial future medical care is anticipated including the prospect of multiple hip replacement surgeries over her lifetime.”

The complaint points out that the scooters are not equipped with signals, even though it claims this is not much of a reach: “The technology exists to add turn signals to the scooters. Manufacturers of personally owned scooters have added turn signals.” There are also aftermarket turn signals which can be added to scooters.

The counts include gross negligence, strict product liability, negligent misrepresentation, and breach of implied warranty, among other things.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Jump, Lime, Other City Scooters No Signals California Complaint

September 24, 2020

City transportation is no longer limited to buses and subways. Rental scooters are now on offer from a number of companies, including Jump, a division of Uber Technologies, Inc.; Lime, which is officially Neutron Holdings, Inc.; Segway, Inc., and Xioami USA, LLC. This class action brings suit against these companies, alleging that there is no safe way to follow city laws that require hand signaling while riding these vehicles.

Jump, Lime, Other City Scooters No Signals California Complaint

Case Event History

Jump, Lime, Other City Scooters No Signals California Complaint

September 24, 2020

City transportation is no longer limited to buses and subways. Rental scooters are now on offer from a number of companies, including Jump, a division of Uber Technologies, Inc.; Lime, which is officially Neutron Holdings, Inc.; Segway, Inc., and Xioami USA, LLC. This class action brings suit against these companies, alleging that there is no safe way to follow city laws that require hand signaling while riding these vehicles.

Jump, Lime, Other City Scooters No Signals California Complaint
Tags: Defective Product, Scooter