Hilton Worldwide Too Much Info on Receipts FACTA Class Action

The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) was passed quite a few years ago—in 2003, in fact. Companies were given three years—until December 2006—to comply with its requirements. The complaint for this class action alleges that many years later, in December 2019, Hilton Worldwide Holdings, Inc. had still somehow managed not to bring its consumer point-of-service receipt equipment up to date.

FACTA was meant to help protect consumers from identity theft and credit or debit card fraud. For example, as one previous case found, Congress was attempting to “restrict the amount of information available to identity thieves.” It does this by forbidding merchants from printing more than the last five digits of their credit or debit cards, or the cards’ expiration dates, on the paper receipts printed for them at the point of sale for their transactions.

In this case, plaintiff Kevin Rouse made a number of purchases with his credit or debit card at the Hilton Fiji Resort & Spa, including at its Deli Restaurant and Jack’s of Fiji, on Denarau Island, Fiji. At each of these transactions, Rouse received a point-of-sale printed receipt which displayed both the first four and last four digits of his credit or debit card.

The complaint reviews the history of FACTA, pointing out how quickly Visa, American Express, and other card companies amended their rules for merchants to require compliance with the law. The complaint also says, “During the three-year phase-in period, there was extensive publicity regarding the law’s requirements.” Trade associations also undertook to inform their merchant members of FACTA’s requirements.

Even with all this, many companies were not ready to comply with the law by December 2006. Congress then passed the “Credit and Debit Card Receipt Clarification Act to give merchants some amnesty and extend the date of some aspects of compliance to June 3, 2008.

The complaint thus contends that by 2009, Hilton had adequate notice and time to prepare to comply with the law and should not have been printing so many card digits on receipts.

The class for this action is all persons to whom Hilton Worldwide Holdings provided an electronically-printed receipt at the point of sale or transaction, where the transaction occurred between March 25, 2018 and March 25, 2020, on which Hilton printed (1) more than the last five digits of the person’s credit or debit card number or (2) the expiration date of the person’s credit card number.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Privacy

Most Recent Case Event

Hilton Worldwide Too Much Info on Receipts FACTA Complaint

March 25, 2020

The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) was passed quite a few years ago—in 2003, in fact. Companies were given three years—until December 2006—to comply with its requirements. The complaint for this class action alleges that many years later, in December 2019, Hilton Worldwide Holdings, Inc. had still somehow managed not to bring its consumer point-of-service receipt equipment up to date.

Hilton Worldwide Too Much Info on Receipts FACTA Complaint

Case Event History

Hilton Worldwide Too Much Info on Receipts FACTA Complaint

March 25, 2020

The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) was passed quite a few years ago—in 2003, in fact. Companies were given three years—until December 2006—to comply with its requirements. The complaint for this class action alleges that many years later, in December 2019, Hilton Worldwide Holdings, Inc. had still somehow managed not to bring its consumer point-of-service receipt equipment up to date.

Hilton Worldwide Too Much Info on Receipts FACTA Complaint
Tags: FACTA, Too Much Card Info Printed on Receipt