GE Soda Lime Glass Front Ovens Break from Heat Class Action

General Electric Company is an enormous makers of home appliances. This class action brings suit against the company and Haier US Appliance Solutions, Inc., which does business as GE Appliances, for defective glass ovens with glass front doors made of soda lime glass. The complaint alleges that the glass fronts can break or shatter under normal household use.

The Nationwide Class for this action is all persons living in the US who own or owned a GE oven with a glass-front door made of soda lime glass, during the fullest period allowed by law. A New York Class has also been defined for those persons of the above group living in New York.

The complaint quotes the GE Appliances website as claiming that the companies “build the world’s best appliances that are in half of all U.S. home.” The companies sell, among other things, ovens with soda lime glass-front doors, which sell for between $500 and $4,000. However, the complaint alleges that “the soda lime glass used in the glass-front doors cannot withstand the high temperatures that are common when the Ovens are used for their ordinary purpose, resulting in shattering of the glass within the glass-front door…”

According to the complaint, when soda lime glass is heated, it “expands substantially more than glass manufactured with other, more suitable types of glass,” such as borosilicate glass. Soda lime glass “has a high coefficient of thermal expansion with very poor thermal shock resistance.” It is, however, less expensive to make, the complaint says.

To improve its thermal shock resistance, the complaint says, soda lime glass must be tempered, or strengthened with heat. However, this does not work if the glass is used in an oven: “Rather, tempering exacerbates the problems associated with soda lime glass, particularly if the Oven glass doors made with soda lime glass are unevenly and poorly heated (i.e., tempered), or not heated to high enough temperatures to enhance the safety of the glass.

The plaintiff in this case, Asher Haft, bought a GE 30” Built-In Single Convection Wall Oven on March 20, 2018. The oven cost $1,175. He had the oven professionally installed and has only subjected it to normal, household use.

On October 22, 2020, the oven was set at 450 degrees, when Haft’s wife heard a popping sound coming from the kitchen. She found that the door glass had cracked in multiple locations. The complaint displays three images of the cracks in the front glass.

According to the complaint, “GE refused to provide full reimbursement” for the $283.31 repair and only paid him $118.95 for the labor.

The complaint alleges that GE knew about the defect but continued to sell the ovens without warning consumers.

The counts include breach of contract and breaches of warranties, among other things.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

GE Soda Lime Glass Front Ovens Break from Heat Complaint

January 20, 2021

General Electric Company is an enormous makers of home appliances. This class action brings suit against the company and Haier US Appliance Solutions, Inc., which does business as GE Appliances, for defective glass ovens with glass front doors made of soda lime glass. The complaint alleges that the glass fronts can break or shatter under normal household use.

GE Soda Lime Glass Front Ovens Break from Heat Complaint

Case Event History

GE Soda Lime Glass Front Ovens Break from Heat Complaint

January 20, 2021

General Electric Company is an enormous makers of home appliances. This class action brings suit against the company and Haier US Appliance Solutions, Inc., which does business as GE Appliances, for defective glass ovens with glass front doors made of soda lime glass. The complaint alleges that the glass fronts can break or shatter under normal household use.

GE Soda Lime Glass Front Ovens Break from Heat Complaint
Tags: Breaking or Shattering Glass, Defective Home Appliance, Defective Product, Oven