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Four Seasons Westlake Village Credit Card Receipt FACTA Class Action

Sometimes it takes a small business a little while to catch up with new laws—but we expect better of a Four Seasons Hotel. Unfortunately, the complaint for this class action alleges that receipts printed at the Four Seasons Westlake Village violate the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) because they include the expiration dates of the payment cards that customers use.

The class for this action is

  • All persons in the US
  • To whom Four Seasons Hotels or Westlake Wellbeing Properties provided an electronically printed hardcopy receipt at the point of sale
  • On which was printed more than the last five digits of a customer’s credit or debit card number and/or the expiration date of the card
  • Since September 1, 2015.

Congress passed FACTA in 2003 to help prevent identity theft and credit card fraud, a growing problem given the growing number of electronic transactions. One of the law’s provisions was that people who accepted credit or debit cards for business transactions were not permitted to print more than the last five digits of the card number on receipts provided at the point of sale.

Although FACTA was signed into law in 2003, it did not become fully effective until 2006, to give merchants time to prepare for the changes required. In spite of this three-year window, many businesses did not prepare, and another act was passed in 2007 to delay liability for violations of the law, thus giving them more time to prepare.

But according to the complaint, when plaintiff Scott Edelstein used a MasterCard to pay for his stay at the Four Seasons Westlake Village in 2017, the receipt he received showed more than the last five digits of his credit card along with the expiration date. Similarly, the complaint alleges that when plaintiff Steven Brooks used his Visa card to pay for his stay at the hotel, the receipt he was given showed more than the last five digits of the credit card plus the expiration date. Both these instances, the complaint claims, are violations of FACTA, even though the hotel has had more than a decade to comply with the law.

Identity theft and credit card fraud are real threats to consumers that can take years to unravel, and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reported in 2016 that it was the top complaint it had received for fifteen years. The complaint claims that skilled criminals can use certain techniques to determine the full credit card number from the last few digits, and giving them the expiration date as well is handing them a final piece of what they need to commit identity theft or fraud.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Four Seasons Westlake Village Credit Card Receipt FACTA Complaint

September 1, 2017

Congress passed FACTA in 2003 to help prevent identity theft and credit card fraud. One of the law’s provisions was that people who accepted credit or debit cards for business transactions were not permitted to print more than the last five digits of the card number on receipts provided at the point of sale. But according to the complaint, in 2017, when the plaintiffs in this class paid for their stays at the Four Seasons Westlake Village, their receipts showed more than the last five digits of his credit card along with the expiration date. Both these instances, the complaint claims, are violations of FACTA, even though the hotel has had more than a decade to comply with the law.

westlake_facta_complaint.pdf

Case Event History

Four Seasons Westlake Village Credit Card Receipt FACTA Complaint

September 1, 2017

Congress passed FACTA in 2003 to help prevent identity theft and credit card fraud. One of the law’s provisions was that people who accepted credit or debit cards for business transactions were not permitted to print more than the last five digits of the card number on receipts provided at the point of sale. But according to the complaint, in 2017, when the plaintiffs in this class paid for their stays at the Four Seasons Westlake Village, their receipts showed more than the last five digits of his credit card along with the expiration date. Both these instances, the complaint claims, are violations of FACTA, even though the hotel has had more than a decade to comply with the law.

westlake_facta_complaint.pdf
Tags: Expiration Date Printed, FACTA, More Than Five Credit/Debit Card Numbers Printed