fbpx

FasciaBlaster Bruising and False Benefit Claims Class Action

Is a two-foot stick with curved prongs, selling for $89, a good tool to reduce pain, improve flexibility, and eliminate cellulite? According to the complaint for this class action, the FasciaBlaster does not—and cannot—do any of this.

All consumers who bought the FasciaBlaster anywhere in the US during the Class Period. The complaint also raises the possibility of California, Nevada, Arizona, Florida, Louisiana, and Missouri subclasses.

The advertising for the FasciaBlaster, sold by the Ashley Black Company, claims it “opens the fascia and breaks up fascial adhesions.” According to the complaint, though, “fascia” refers primarily to “the collagen wrappings around internal organs and muscles as well as the sheaths around nerves and blood vessels.” It questions whether such things as “fascial adhesions” even exist, and mentions “the dangers of actually rupturing fascia” which could lead to “damage to skin, organs, nerves, lymph glands…” and other internal parts of the body.

The item is supposed to be used by grinding the spikes into the body. The complaint quotes the following from a paragraph on the FasciaBlaster’s website: “With regular use of the FasciaBlaster, one can expect pain reduction and improved flexibility, joint function, circulation, muscle definition and performance, nerve activity, posture, and enhanced beauty including the virtual elimination of CELLULITE.”

However, according to the complaint, there is no reliable scientific evidence that it can do any of these things. In fact, the website allegedly contains a small “legal disclaimer” which says, in part, “All claims and results within are based on years of anecdotal evidence. The company is currently studying claims for scientific validation.”

This is not to say that the FasciaBlaster produces no results whatsoever. In fact, according to the complaint, it does produce pain and bruising. The complaint quotes the website as saying, “Bruising after FasciaBlasting is a TOTALLY normal, healthy part of the restorative process and means it’s working!” For recovery, the complaint says, the website offers an “After Blaster” lotion that contains a numbing agent.

The complaint alleges numerous violations of laws, including the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, the Consumer Legal Remedies Act, the California Business & Professions Code, and many other state laws.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

FasciaBlaster Bruising and False Benefit Claims Complaint

Is a two-foot stick with curved prongs, selling for $89, a good tool to reduce pain, improve flexibility, and eliminate cellulite? According to the complaint for this class action, the FasciaBlaster does not—and cannot—do any of this, but it can cause pain and bruising.

fascialblaser_fraud_complaint.pdf

Case Event History

FasciaBlaster Bruising and False Benefit Claims Complaint

Is a two-foot stick with curved prongs, selling for $89, a good tool to reduce pain, improve flexibility, and eliminate cellulite? According to the complaint for this class action, the FasciaBlaster does not—and cannot—do any of this, but it can cause pain and bruising.

fascialblaser_fraud_complaint.pdf
Tags: Deceptive Advertising, False Health Claims