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Dramatics for Hair Website Americans with Disabilities Act Violation Class Action

The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed to give disabled Americans the same access to businesses and government enjoyed by other Americans, thus making them freer and more self-sufficient. The Act requires that provisions be made so that public accommodations—such as stores, restaurants, offices, government facilities, and websites—are accessible to people with common handicaps. However, the complaint for this class action alleges that the Dramatics for Hair companies, the defendants in this case, have not bothered to design, construct, maintain, or operate their website in a manner that allows blind persons to use it with the aid of screen-reading software.

The class for this action is all legally blind individuals in the US who have attempted to access defendants’ website and as a result have been denied access to equal enjoyment of goods and services offered in defendants’ physical locations, during the relevant statutory period.

Steven Matzura, the plaintiff in this case, is legally blind, as are 2 million other people in the US, with a total of 8.1 million being visually-impaired, according to a 2010 US Census Report. The Internet is now a significant source of information, a tool for conducting business, and means of completing everyday activities, and when websites are properly constructed and maintained, blind and visually impaired people like Matzura can use a number of screen-reading software programs to read the visual parts of websites.

But for screen-reading software to work, the website must be constructed so that all parts of it can be rendered into text, so that forms can work properly, and so that structure can be understood by other than visual means. According to the complaint, the Dramatics for Hair website, www.dramaticsnyc.com, is not constructed in this way, and when Matzura attempted to use it, he encountered numerous barriers to using it as was intended—as a “gateway” to the company’s physical hair salons, offering features such as listings of locations, hours, services, and prices.

The World Wide Web Consortium has published a 2.0 version of its Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0) for making websites accessible to blind and visually-impaired people. These are now universally followed by most large businesses and government agencies. The plaintiff requests an injunction requiring defendants to retain a qualified consultant to help them make their site compliant with the  WCAG 2.0 guidelines, to train employees and agents on accessibility, to regularly check and test the website for accessibility, and to develop an accessibility policy to be disclosed on the website.  

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Civil Rights

Most Recent Case Event

Dramatics for Hair Website Americans with Disabilities Act Violation Complaint

July 11, 2017

The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed to give disabled Americans the same access to businesses and government enjoyed by other Americans, thus making them freer and more self-sufficient. The Act requires that provisions be made so that public accommodations—such as stores, restaurants, offices, government facilities, and websites—are accessible to people with common handicaps. However, the complaint for this class action alleges that the Dramatics for Hair companies, the defendants in this case, have not bothered to design, construct, maintain, or operate their website in a manner that allows blind persons to use it with the aid of screen-reading software.

dramatics_complaint.pdf

Case Event History

Dramatics for Hair Website Americans with Disabilities Act Violation Complaint

July 11, 2017

The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed to give disabled Americans the same access to businesses and government enjoyed by other Americans, thus making them freer and more self-sufficient. The Act requires that provisions be made so that public accommodations—such as stores, restaurants, offices, government facilities, and websites—are accessible to people with common handicaps. However, the complaint for this class action alleges that the Dramatics for Hair companies, the defendants in this case, have not bothered to design, construct, maintain, or operate their website in a manner that allows blind persons to use it with the aid of screen-reading software.

dramatics_complaint.pdf
Tags: Americans with Disabilities Act, Civil Rights, Legally Blind