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Crest, Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpastes Illinois Class Action

Can toothpastes really help repair gums? The complaint for this class action says no. It bring suit against the Procter & Gamble Company (P&G) for the marketing and labeling of two of its products: Crest Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste, in Intensive Clean and Advanced Whitening varieties, and Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste.

The class for this action is all persons in Illinois who bought one of the products as issue between the starting date for the statute of limitations and the date the class is certified in this case.

Periodontal diseases can cause gums to pull away from teeth. If the disease gets worse, the tissue and bone supporting the teeth may be destroyed. If this happens, teeth may fall out or have to be removed.

Periodontal diseases purportedly are caused by plaque. If plaque is not removed, it can lead the gums to pull away from the teeth, which in turn leaves space in which bacteria can collect. The plaque eventually hardens into tartar.

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), the complaint says, early-stage gum disease can be reversed if not much damage has been done, but this process requires professional assistance to scrape the hardened plaque off the teeth and out of the pockets where the gums are pulling away.

“While brushing can help prevent further gum recession,” the complaint claims, “it is well accepted that” it won’t correct existing gum retreat. The complaint quotes the Colgate website as saying, “Once the gum tissue has pulled back and away from the teeth, it’s gone for good.” Procedures to repair this condition are surgical, the complaint says, such as gum grafting and the pinhole surgical technique.

The complaint reviews P&G toothpastes to cover their various promises and then attempts to define how a Gum & Enamel Repair toothpaste would be different. “By offering a different toothpaste in the Gum Health line called Gum & Enamel Repair,” the complaint alleges, P&G intended to suggest that Gum & Enamel Repair toothpaste had different benefits…—namely, the ability to repair gums.” This is false and misleading, the complaint says, because “no toothpaste or toothpaste ingredient can repair gums or damage done to gums by periodontal disease.”

While toothpaste makers are allowed to say their product can “control,” “reduce,” “prevent,” or “remove” the plaque that leads to gum disease, the complaint alleges this is different than claiming that it can repair gums.

Around July 2018, the Advertising Standards Authority, the UK’s independent advertising regulator, banned a P&G ad for its Oral-B Gum and Enamel Repair Toothpaste because the use of “repair” and “restore” suggested that the toothpaste could reverse damage to gums. P&G, however, did not amend its labeling for the products for the US market.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Crest, Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpastes Illinois Complaint

March 12, 2021

Can toothpastes really help repair gums? The complaint for this class action says no. It bring suit against the Procter & Gamble Company (P&G) for the marketing and labeling of two of its products: Crest Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste, in Intensive Clean and Advanced Whitening varieties, and Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste.

Crest, Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpastes Illinois Complaint

Case Event History

Crest, Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpastes Illinois Complaint

March 12, 2021

Can toothpastes really help repair gums? The complaint for this class action says no. It bring suit against the Procter & Gamble Company (P&G) for the marketing and labeling of two of its products: Crest Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste, in Intensive Clean and Advanced Whitening varieties, and Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste.

Crest, Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpastes Illinois Complaint
Tags: Claims Unsupported By Scientific Evidence, Deceptive Advertising, Deceptive Labels, Item Does Not Do What It Is Advertised to Do