Coleman “1 Day” to “7 Day” Ice Coolers Ice Retention Class Action

How long should an ice cooler keep ice from melting? The complaint alleges that the Coleman Company, Inc. deceptively markets a line of ice coolers, labeling them “1 Day” through “7 Days,” purportedly according to their ability to retain ice. The complaint claims that the products do not have the ability to retain ice for the advertised times.

The class for this action is all persons who bought one or more of Coleman’s “1 Day” to “7 Days” coolers in the US or its territories.

The complaint defines ice as “the solid state of water” or “water that maintains a temperature of 32 degrees Fahrenheit.” It defines “retain” as to “keep in possession or [be] able to hold.” According to the complaint, using these strict definitions, “any amount of ice left in an ice cooler should remain in solid state of matter. Once any part of the original ice has melted, it [has] failed to ‘retain’ the characteristics.”

However, different parties have different definitions. The complaint says, “The consumers’ definition of [a failure of] ‘ice retention’ is when the original ice is fully non-functional and loses most of the ability to keep items chilled.” It says that Coleman’s apparent definition of “ice retention” appears to involved “the [number] of days it takes most or all of the ice to be melted into liquid starting from the ice filled to full capacity.”

Some of the products do show a disclaimer or qualifier, such as “Ice Storage at 90 degrees Fahrenheit.” But not all of the products have it, and when they do, the complaint claims that it “is in lighter color and very small font to prevent buyers from noticing it.”

The complaint reproduces postings from buyers at the Walmart.com website. Excerpts include the following:

  • “With two bags of ice it only kept ice and items cold for ¾ of a day!”
  • “Was reading reviews and thought I would give this cooler a chance with it saying 5 days of holding ice. It does not last even through a night.”
  • “It[’]s advertised to keep ice for 5 days. I’m not sure we’ve even made it through a day without complete melting. And the weather where I live isn’t the hottest of the hot…”

Additionally, various YouTube users have tried a “5 Day Ice Challenge” with the product. The complaint alleges that, in one, the cooler was filled to the brim with ice, but that all the ice was melted within 96 hours, or four days.

The complaint alleges that the product cannot perform as advertised. “The ice will never be functional for claimed period of time in [Coleman’s] ice cooler under normal use. If the food and beverage items were left in the cooler with ice for five days, the items will be submerged in water.” It says that Coleman’s claims are “false, materially misleading, and reasonably likely to deceive the public at large.”

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Coleman “1 Day” to “7 Day” Ice Coolers Ice Retention Complaint

October 31, 2020

How long should an ice cooler keep ice from melting? The complaint alleges that the Coleman Company, Inc. deceptively markets a line of ice coolers, labeling them “1 Day” through “7 Days,” purportedly according to their ability to retain ice. The complaint claims that the products do not have the ability to retain ice for the advertised times.

Coleman “1 Day” to “7 Day” Ice Coolers Ice Retention Complaint

Case Event History

Coleman “1 Day” to “7 Day” Ice Coolers Ice Retention Complaint

October 31, 2020

How long should an ice cooler keep ice from melting? The complaint alleges that the Coleman Company, Inc. deceptively markets a line of ice coolers, labeling them “1 Day” through “7 Days,” purportedly according to their ability to retain ice. The complaint claims that the products do not have the ability to retain ice for the advertised times.

Coleman “1 Day” to “7 Day” Ice Coolers Ice Retention Complaint
Tags: Cooler, Deceptive Advertising, Deceptive Labels, Item Does Not Do What It Is Advertised to Do