Clarisonic Face Brush Not Waterproof Class Action

Clarisonic face brushes are supposed to be waterproof—or at least so says their maker, L’Oreal USA, Inc., for example on the packaging of the brushes. However, the complaint for this class action alleges that the brushes are not waterproof and that using them to wash the face according to directions may lead to battery failure.

The Nationwide Class for this action is all persons in the US who bought the Clarisonics brushes. There is also a California Subclass for those who bought them in California.

L’Oreal is the world’s largest cosmetic company, with more than thirty brands for makeup, hair, fragrance, and skin care. It makes five models of Clarisonic brushes: Mia 1, Mia 2, Prima, Mia Smart, and Mia Men.

The complaint reproduces what it calls the “waterproof warranty,” which is a panel that says, “Waterproof: Use it in the shower, bath, or sink” along with a pattern of wavy lines. The packages depict the brushes as made for use in water because they depict water running behind or on the brushes. Also, an ad reproduced in the complaint says: “Power to the Pores: Our patented technology activates the power of water to gently clear away what otherwise may hide deep inside pores.”

Even Clarisonics has admitted that the brushes may fail if water gets inside them. The complaint quotes an unattributed statement, presumably from the company, saying, “Our devices are not repairable, nor are the batteries replaceable. Clarisonic devices are sealed to be waterproof so they can be used freely near water and in the shower. If the waterproof seal is broken the likelihood of water leaking into the device is high, further compromising the device’s internal components.”

The devices are not cheap. In December 2018, Plaintiff Nicole Marroquin bought a Clarisonic Mia 1 from an Ulta store in Clovis, California for $129. At the time, she reviewed the labels and marketing materials for the product and understood that the brushes were waterproof.

In early 2020, the complaint claims, Marroquin’s Clarisonic stopped working and would not charge. Similarly, the complaint alleges that other consumers “have reported that their Clarisonics will abruptly stop functioning within the useful life of the Clarisonics, despite being used according to direction, and will no longer charge.” The complaint alleges that this is because the brushes were “made defectively…”

According to the complaint, L’Oreal “was undoubtedly aware of the Clarisonics’ defective nature because numerous consumers have made warranty claims under Clarisonics’ one-year warranty.”

The complaint alleges that L’Oreal “has not publicly acknowledged the defect or attempted to fix it. Instead, when consumers take advantage of the Clarisonics’ warranty, Clarisonic sends replacement Clairisonics that suffer from the same defect.” Yet L’Oreal continues to sell the Clarisonics brushes.

The complaint alleges breaches of warranties and violations of consumer protection laws, among other things.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Clarisonic Face Brush Not Waterproof Complaint

June 5, 2020

Clarisonic face brushes are supposed to be waterproof—or at least so says their maker, L’Oreal USA, Inc., for example on the packaging of the brushes. However, the complaint for this class action alleges that the brushes are not waterproof and that using them to wash the face according to directions may lead to battery failure.

Clarisonic Face Brush Not Waterproof Complaint

Case Event History

Clarisonic Face Brush Not Waterproof Complaint

June 5, 2020

Clarisonic face brushes are supposed to be waterproof—or at least so says their maker, L’Oreal USA, Inc., for example on the packaging of the brushes. However, the complaint for this class action alleges that the brushes are not waterproof and that using them to wash the face according to directions may lead to battery failure.

Clarisonic Face Brush Not Waterproof Complaint
Tags: Brush, Defective Product