Apple Battery-Problem Upgrade Slows iPhone Performance Class Action

Did Apple “throttle” older iPhones in order to get customers to buy new models? According to the complaint for this class action, the company put out an update that was meant to help with battery problems but which did this by slowing the phones’ performance, a problem the company did not tell users when they upgraded.

The class for this action is all persons and entities in the US who own or owned an iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s, 6s Plus, SE, 7, or & Plus and installed iOS 10.2.1 or 11.2 on it.

Apple has now sold over a billion iPhones “that are designed to offer fast performance and ease of use” to customers, the complaint claims. The phones are not cheap, with newer models costing between $699 and $999.

The complaint points out that the phones use Apple’s proprietary iOS operating system and that users must get upgrades from the company. Apple periodically puts out upgrades that add new features, address security risks, or fix problems, and the complaint says that users are used to installing these to improve functionality whenever they get a pop-up message informing them that an upgrade is available.

In 2016, some iPhone 6, 6s, and 6 Plus models were shutting down unexpectedly, with users having to plug them into outlets to get them to work again. In November of that year, Apple offered free battery replacements for owners of 6s devices manufacture between September and October 2015, within a certain range of serial numbers.

Sometime after that, it introduced the 10.2.1 upgrade it said would “improve power management during peak workloads and avoid unexpected shutdowns…” What the company did not tell consumers was that it would also slow the performance of their iPhones.

On December 18, 2017, John Poole of Primate Labs published the results of his investigation into iPhones running different versions of the iOS. He said, “The difference between iOS 10.2.0 and 10.2.1 is too abrupt to be just a function of battery condition.” He said he believed that Apple had “introduced a change to limit performance when battery condition decreases past a certain point.” When phones get slow, he pointed out, users generally think they should replace the phones rather than that they should replace the phones’ batteries.

Ten days later, Apple apologized, admitted that the upgraded system “dynamically manages the maximum performance of some system components when needed to prevent a shutdown.” The company then reduced the price for battery replacements on iPhone 6 or later models from $79 to $29 through January 2018.

The complaint asks, among other things, for compensation for the results of the slowing of consumers’ phones, including the cost of unnecessary replacements of iPhones.

Article Type: Lawsuit
Topic: Consumer

Most Recent Case Event

Apple Battery-Problem Upgrade Slows iPhone Performance Complaint

April 11, 2018

Did Apple “throttle” older iPhones in order to get customers to buy new models? According to the complaint for this class action, the company put out an update that was meant to help with battery problems but which did this by slowing the phones’ performance, a problem the company did not tell users when they upgraded.

apple_iphone_slow_performance_complaint.pdf

Case Event History

Apple Battery-Problem Upgrade Slows iPhone Performance Complaint

April 11, 2018

Did Apple “throttle” older iPhones in order to get customers to buy new models? According to the complaint for this class action, the company put out an update that was meant to help with battery problems but which did this by slowing the phones’ performance, a problem the company did not tell users when they upgraded.

apple_iphone_slow_performance_complaint.pdf
Tags: Defective Product, Electronic Apps and Updates